Annie McKee featured in new HBR.org piece, “Dealing with Your Incompetent Boss,”

http://blogs.hbr.org/hmu/2011/06/dealing-with-your-incompetent.html

Excerpt:

Think twice before ratting anyone out
When you’re working for someone who isn’t getting the job done, it can be tempting to go to your boss’s boss or another leader in the organization. First consider the consequences. “Hierarchy is alive and well. And this person has more power than you do. If you’re going to expose them, you need to understand the political current in your organization,” warns McKee. People at the top of an organization may feel threatened if they see someone trying to take down their peer and may be unwilling to help. Useem agrees. “It’s hazardous to speak up in a very pragmatic sense. If it becomes known that it was you, who’s going to be the first to go?” he says. So if you do decide to formally complain, he advises doing it carefully. Test the waters with someone you trust before going to HR or a superior.

Both McKee and Useem emphasize that there are times when you are obligated to speak up. “In extreme circumstances, if the boss is involved in malfeasance, you have a duty to act,” says Useem. In these cases, you need to go to HR and report what you have observed. Be ready to share evidence.

 

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